The Journal of Physiology publishes research in all areas of physiology and pathophysiology that illustrates new physiological principles, mechanisms or premises. Papers on work at the molecular level, cell membrane, single cells, tissues or organs, and on systems physiology are all encouraged. We are particularly keen on research that has a clinical or translational focus, to help further our understanding of the role physiology plays in health and disease.

A publication of The Physiological Society

Featured in The Journal of Physiology

Browse Articles

Adaptation in the spinal cord after stroke: Implications for restoring cortical control over the final common pathway

  •  24 May 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

Abstract figure legend A coarse approximation of the organization of white matter tracts that transmit descending commands from cortical motor areas to spinal motor neuron pools. Fibres that roughly segregate into each tract at the level of the brainstem overlap in cortical origin and intermingle throughout their cranial course. Corticospinal fibres that decussate in the medullary pyramids exist both anterior and posterior to the central canal in the lateral funiculus. A considerably smaller portion of corticospinal fibres cross more caudally in the cervical spinal cord and course along the median fissure in the ventral funiculus. Rubrospinal fibres originating in the red nucleus that decussate at the midbrain are sparse in the spinal cord when actually observed in human cases and do not exist below upper cervical segments. Reticulospinal fibres originating in the pontine reticular formation exist throughout the spinal cord but do not form a compact bundle and tend to be scattered in the cord, coursing anterior to corticospinal fibres. Propriospinal fibres are found near dorsal and ventral horns most prominently at cervical and lumbar enlargements, with short fibres closest to the spinal grey matter and long fibres more lateral. Created with BioRender.com

Homeostasis and evolution in relation to regeneration and repair

  •  23 May 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

Abstract figure legend Natural selection might act on homeostatic regulatory mechanisms and on other control mechanisms including homeorhesis where different stable stationary states are reached. Regeneration is under homeostatic control and damage to tissues initiates a response to restore the equilibrium, whereas repair is a homeorhetic change leading to a new stable stationary state with a decreased functionality. Entrance of tissues or organs into regeneration or repair depends on external changing environmental conditions and signalling pathways for which regulation has evolved in different species. Regenerative and repair capacities vary among different species and in different tissues and organs. They also vary at distinct stages of differentiation and development and ageing, reaching different stable stationary states, as part of adaptive processes installed during thousands of years of evolution.

Open access

Symposium review: high altitude travel with pulmonary vascular disease

  •  23 May 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

Abstract figure legend Considerations for altitude travel in pulmonary vascular disease patients, focusing on sensible pre-travel evaluation, possible altitude-related adverse events and their management.

Molecular and cellular neurocardiology in heart disease

  •  22 May 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

Abstract figure legend A summary diagram illustrating the progression of autonomic dysfunction following cardiac injury or disease, and some of the tools used for investigating and/or manipulating neural and cardiac function. Afferent neurotransmission is increased and may contribute to the pathological remodelling of efferent autonomic activity, which is generally characterized by sympathetic hyperactivity and withdrawal of parasympathetic tone. Cardiac injury and cardiovascular disease are also associated with altered neuropeptide and neurotransmitter synthesis and changes in cardiac nerve density. Created with BioRender.com.

Open access

The RhoA guanine exchange factor ABR: a glucose‐sensitive mediator of actin reorganization in feto‐placental arterial endothelial cells altered by gestational diabetes mellitus

  •  22 May 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

Abstract figure legend Schematic representation of proposed relationship between hyperglycaemia, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), active BCR-related (ABR), RhoA and actin organization of feto-placental arterial endothelial cells (fpEC). Hyperglycaemia upregulates ABR, which in turn increases RhoA activation. This results in a rounder cell shape with irregular actin organization and increased network formation.

Open access

Direct assessment of leukocyte signalling and cytokine secretion reveals exercise intensity‐dependent reductions in anti‐inflammatory cytokine action

  •  22 May 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

Abstract figure legend An acute bout of exercise can increase circulating cytokine concentrations and immune cell counts. Our findings show that these systemic increases in anti-inflammatory cytokines and immune cell counts are paralleled by a hyporesponsiveness to anti-inflammatory cytokine action – as reflected by the blunted activation of intracellular signalling and higher pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in blood leukocytes ex vivo – following higher intensity exercise. This transient hyporesponsiveness to anti-inflammatory cytokine action may facilitate inflammatory processes mediating adaptive remodelling following exercise.

Open access

Impact of nocturnal hypoxia on glycaemic control, appetite, gut microbiota and inflammation in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A single‐blind cross‐over trial

  •  20 May 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

Abstract figure legend Summary of the effects of nocturnal hypoxia on glycaemic control, appetite, gut microbiota and inflammation in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Living at altitude lowers the incidence of T2DM. Thirteen adults with T2DM completed a single-blind, randomised, sham-controlled, cross-over study for 10 nights, sleeping when exposed to hypoxia (fractional inspired O2 = 0.155) or normoxic conditions. Appetite and inflammatory markers were unchanged following hypoxic exposure, but an increased insulin sensitivity and reduced gut microbiota alpha diversity were associated with a medium effect-size and statistical trends, which warrant further investigation using a definitive large randomised controlled trial.

Open access

Bed rest impairs the vestibular control of balance

  •  20 May 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

Abstract figure legend Here we investigated impaired balance following prolonged bed rest. After spending 60 days undergoing 6 degrees head-down bed rest, volunteers exhibited a 63% increase in Centre of Pressure speed when subsequently attempting to stand still. This change in postural sway did not correlate with loss of leg muscle strength. However, when we used Electrical Vestibular Stimulation to evoke sway responses, we found increased variability in the direction of the evoked response following bed rest. Furthermore, this increase was significantly correlated with the increase in postural sway. These findings suggest the effect of bed rest upon postural control may partially be accounted for by impaired vestibulo-motor transformations for balance.

Open access

Piperine enhances contractile force in slow‐ and fast‐twitch muscle

  •  19 May 2024

Graphical Abstract

Description unavailable

Abstract figure legend Exposure to piperine enhances skeletal muscle force production in isolated rat muscles. The force enhancements are pronounced for muscles primarily consisting of either fast-twitch (extensor digitorum longus) or slow-twitch (soleus) fibres. These experiments illustrate a novel and concentration-dependent force potentiating effect of piperine in skeletal muscle.

More articles
More articles

Latest news